Akip fishing lure exported to Asia and Europe

H Ataur Rahman Akib poses for photos with a fish he caught with a fishing rod. The Rajshahi businessman started fishing when he was four years old and his passion drove him to turn it into a fish bait business. Its baits are exported to Asia and Europe. Photo: collage

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H Ataur Rahman Akib poses for photos with a fish he caught with a fishing rod. The Rajshahi businessman started fishing when he was four years old and his passion drove him to turn it into a fish bait business. Its baits are exported to Asia and Europe. Photo: collage

H Ataur Rahman Akib started hunting when he was four years old and was highly focused on his hobby and bait making until 2018.

His passion took a new turn in the year when an amateur fisherman sent an Akib Tk 2000 and asked him to make him a bait. This was the beginning.

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When the demands on his bait rose, he turned his hobby into a full-time business. He hasn’t had to look back since.

Today, Akip, who hails from Rajshahi, has a factory in his residence in the Thakurmara district in the north of the city that manufactures eco-friendly lures for game hunting.

In the past four years, Akib’s baits, Primitive Fishing by Akib, have gained immense popularity across the country and abroad as well.

The plant produces at least 14 types of baits.

All the products are sold in different regions in Bangladesh and are exported to India, Pakistan, Nepal, Malaysia, Europe, especially the UK.

In 2019, it began exporting 100 kilograms of bait, and this year the shipment is likely to reach several tons.

Among the baits, “Current Char”, “Ready Tope” and “Jafrani Chhatu” are the most famous.

A pheromone spray called “Agunjol” is manufactured at the plant, which is the only plant of its kind in South Asia.

“We have now taken steps to open our own outlets in India and New Zealand,” Akip said in an interview with the Daily Star recently.

The businessman says he has been fishing since he was four years old.

He studied at Rajuk Uttara Model School and College in Dhaka and moved to New Zealand.

He holds a master’s degree in Information Technology from the University of Auckland. He also holds a diploma in environment.

Akibe began his professional journey in New Zealand, but had to return home in 2017 to take care of his elderly parents.

This was the time when he noticed that various species of local fish were being lost due to unplanned hunting and that the ants were on the verge of extinction due to the rampant use of their eggs for hunting.

The use of harmful chemicals in fishing also did not go unnoticed.

Akip’s experience fishing abroad and his knowledge of the environment helped him think differently.

“I started looking for alternatives,” he said.

He learned that ethical fishing practices occur in different parts of the world and discovered that the elements in ant eggs that attract fish are also found in other natural things. This led him to start making eco-friendly baits.

He opened a YouTube channel called Primitive Fishing By Akib and continued to promote his methods of fishing and baiting.

He received tremendous support from fishermen, first from those who live in Bangladesh and then from various states in India. Amateur fishermen from other countries began to communicate with Akib.

He has seen a huge market for fishing baits waiting in the country and all over the world.

2019 was a turning point in his life. He formed a game fishing club and joined the International Fishing Association.

In the same year, he received official approval from the government as the first manufacturer of fishing baits in the country. He started exporting products as well.

Akibe launched a fishing game called “One Taka Ticket” to promote ethical fishing. During the game, fishermen will buy tickets from Tk 1, but they cannot take more fish than they will consume. Instead, they release all the fish.

His bait sales business grew in the next two years and he transformed his factory from a small shack into a modern unit.

In February this year, the 38-year-old authored ‘Chhip Borshi’ and was awarded the India-Bengali Friendship Award for his role in promoting ethical fishing in the Indian subcontinent last month.

Akip says he never thought his business would get this far.

“My business is growing every day. It can grow even more because the market at home and abroad is huge.”

One day, Akip caught a big catal fish from a body of water, and he handed it to this reporter and wanted to know what his feelings were.

The fish used their full strength to release them. The businessman released the fish into the aquarium.

He said, “I never forget to show respect for this liveliness of fish. I have to take care of the fish species and the nature around us.”

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