Former circus elephants moved to a new fertile reserve

A pair of former zoo elephants have packed their trunks to move to a fertile animal sanctuary after spending their lives in captivity.

The canines, named Pocha and Guillermina, from the Mendoza Zoo in the western Argentine province of Mendoza, traveled by road for six days and arrived at their new home in Brazil on Thursday.

“The country and the world are following with joy and passion the journey of Pocha and Guillermina towards the Elephant Nature Reserve (SEB) in Mato Grosso, Brazil,” the Mendoza state government said in a statement earlier this week.

Elephants Pocha, 55, and her daughter Guillermina, 22, have been moved from a small enclosure in Mendoza, Argentina, to a beautiful natural habitat in Matto Grosso, Brazil.
SINASA/Zinger News

In a statement this week, the Mendoza state government said: “The country and the world are following with joy and passion the journey of Pocha and Guillermina towards the Elephant Nature Reserve (SEB) in Mato Grosso, Brazil.

“The elephants’ transition to freedom, having spent their lives confined to what used to be the Mendoza Zoo, does not go unnoticed.

“At every stop along the way, they receive compliments and affection from the locals.”

Humberto Mingorans, Minister of Environment and Regional Planning for Mendoza, said: “The condition of the elephants is very good, they are relaxed and traveling calmly.

“They were able to rest and sleep through the night and the transport team is providing them with the necessary care on an ongoing basis.

“We are facing a massive and coordinated logistical work that is taking place around the world with a clear goal: animal welfare.”

Former circus elephants moved to the homeland of Brazil
Elephants Pocha, 55, and her daughter Guillermina, 22, have been moved from a small enclosure in Mendoza, Argentina, to a beautiful natural habitat in Matto Grosso, Brazil.
SINASA/Zinger News

“At this time, the elephants are traveling through the province of Entre Ríos with the aim of reaching the border with Brazil tomorrow (Thursday),” the Mendoza government said.

Authorities said the team stopped every three hours to check on the elephants. During the flight, they managed to sleep.

In the meantime, the team was able to rest for six hours every night and also found the trip to Mato Grosso to be comfortable.

SEB, founded in 2012, is a non-profit organization that has helped change the lives of many formerly captive elephants in South America.

This story was provided to Newsweek by Zenger News.

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