The most dangerous place for shark attacks where you should never swim by experts

The shark expert said that to avoid shark bites, beachgoers should change their swimming habits because the ocean has been the most vibrant since the 1950s.

“If you go for a walk in the woods, you’re not going to walk in the middle of a lion chasing a deer,” Chris Fisher, founder of OCEARCH told The Sun. “The same goes for the ocean.”

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The movie Jaws made a misrepresentation of great white sharks, which humans almost wiped out in the 1970s and 1980s.Credit: Chris Ross/OCEARCH
Chris Fisher, founder of OCEARCH, spoke to The Sun in an exclusive interview

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Chris Fisher, founder of OCEARCH, spoke to The Sun in an exclusive interviewCredit: Chris Ross/OCEARCH
OCEARCH is a non-profit organization dedicated to the research and preservation of sharks and other ocean life

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OCEARCH is a non-profit organization dedicated to the research and preservation of sharks and other ocean lifeCredit: Chris Ross/OCEARCH

It really starts with New York and New Jersey protecting the menhaden – also known as the bunker – which swims in large “clouds” and attracts predators like sharks.

The two northern northern states have restricted recreational fishing in state waters, which are defined as three miles from shore.

This is the biggest evidence to watch for, Fisher said, because of the way sharks are caught.

Crowd Tactic – Know It, Watch It And You’ll Be Safe

Sharks push their prey like menhaden ashore in a fishing technique called crowding.

The main reasons behind the rise in shark attacks and linking them to the pandemic have been revealed
Terrifying images show a huge number of great white sharks roaming the American coast

“If they crowd the bait on the beach, they can’t escape very far. They can’t go down because it’s too shallow and they can’t go down to the side because the beach is there,” Fisher said.

“And then when you make them crowded, the sharks start rushing through them and taking turns so they can feed them more successfully.”

Knowing this, Fisher said the biggest key is to watch for a “big ball of bait” anywhere near shore because sharks and other predators are likely not far away.

beach tips

“My advice to beachgoers is to find a nice, quiet part of the beach where that doesn’t happen. This is where you want to spend your time in the water,” Fisher said.

These fish clouds move up and down the shore, so if you notice a ball of fish being pushed ashore, “get out of the water and watch.”

“It’s a great experience,” Fisher said. “It’s like a New York safari, you know, an ocean safari in New York.”

“People pay a lot of money to go around the world to see things like this. Sit back and watch and enjoy it. You’re watching something that hasn’t been seen in 60 or 80 years,” he said.

He said cloud fish usually move along the coast after about 20 to 30 minutes. They may return after an hour or two.

“Once that bait ball on the beach slides away from you, and the ocean is nice and calm and the birds don’t hit the bait, enjoy your time in the water,” Fisher said.

“It’s about changing the way we think about how we interact in the ocean. We grew up in an ocean that has been completely wiped out because we have exhausted it.”

It’s time to evolve as human beings

“Now we need to evolve,” Fisher said. “We need to change. We need to understand that it’s not the same ocean that it was in the ’80s, ’90s, early 2000s, where most of it was dead.”

“We killed all the seals. We sucked up all the menhaden for pet food. We collected all the strippers, red fish, cod and other things because at the time we thought the ocean was so big that we couldn’t affect it by harvesting from it.”

“You can walk anywhere and nothing happens because we wiped out everything. What is happening now as human beings is that we have to make some kind of change and we have to modify our behaviour.”

Explanation of long island sharks

That’s why there have been more than half a dozen shark sightings or bites off the coast of Long Island, which was unknown before the pandemic.

“We’re in the middle of a slow, steady recovery for this population, so it’s just something you’ll see every now and then, because there are more sharks, there are people in the water and there are poor interactions,” Fisher said.

“This is not a mystery. This is not some kind of case of drastic climate change. The ocean is back to what it’s supposed to be. It’s just that none of us have been alive long enough to see that.”

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A shark expert told The Sun that watching and attacking sharks is a ‘gift’ for future generationsCredit: Chris Ross/OCEARCH
An expert told The Sun that this shark that washed up along the Long Island coast was likely going north, 'stop for a snack', got caught and released by the fisherman and 'didn't go well' .

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An expert told The Sun that this shark that washed up along the Long Island coast was likely going north, ‘stop for a snack’, got caught and released by the fisherman and ‘didn’t go well’ .Credit: Quogue Village Police Department
OCEARCH is a leading non-profit group that tags and studies sharks and advances conservation efforts

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OCEARCH is a leading non-profit group that tags and studies sharks and advances conservation effortsCredit: Chris Ross/OCEARCH

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