TV hunter The Bear whisperer faces charges of poaching in Alaska’s Kenai Fjords Park

The star of the reality TV fishing show, The Bear Whisperer, is facing federal charges of poaching in Alaska’s Kenai Fjords National Park.

Harvey Neal Anthony – known professionally as Blaine Anthony – is accused of violating the Lacey Act.

Federal legislation, first introduced in 1900, outlaws the trade in wildlife, fish, and certain plants.

Anthony, 55, of Benton, Maine, allegedly killed a black bear in the national park in May 2017 and then broadcast the footage on his show The Bear Whisperer.

The reality TV star allegedly lied on official papers about where the animal was shot, as it is illegal to hunt inside the park.

“Black bears occur throughout the park and are an important wildlife component of its ecosystem,” read the complaint, first obtained by The Daily Beast. “Fishing is prohibited in the park.”

Court documents report that Anthony participated in at least eight bear hunts “in or around the Kenai Peninsula” between 2011 and 2019, allegedly using footage from 2015 to 2017 on his reality TV show.

‘The Bear Whisperer’ Harvey Neil Anthony has been charged with violating the Lacey Law for allegedly killing two bears inside Kenai Fjords National Park in Alaska.

Anthony - better known as Blaire - allegedly killed a black bear (pictured) inside Alaska's Kenai Fjords National Park, where it is illegal to hunt, in May 2017. He posted photos on his Facebook account, tagging Homer as the site of the killing

Anthony – better known as Blaire – allegedly killed a black bear (pictured) inside Alaska’s Kenai Fjords National Park, where it is illegal to hunt, in May 2017. He posted photos on his Facebook account, tagging Homer as the site of the killing

The state Department of Fish and Game said that out-of-state fishermen also “must be accompanied by a licensed Alaskan guide in the field or a second-degree relative.”

Anthony accompanied the Alaskan captain, known in court documents as “Person A,” on those eight flights.

The complaint alleged that in a multi-day search in May 2017, Anthony and his crew killed a black bear in Pilot Harbor, which is within the national park.

It was then alleged that they transported the bear to Homer on Alfred A’s boat.

Anthony reportedly filed papers on May 12, 2017 falsely listing the murder site as Berger Bay – a legal fishing grounds – and not Kenai Fjords. The two areas are about 20 miles apart.

The bear was reportedly sent home in Maine after it was mummified, according to the complaint.

But prosecutors say there is footage of the event filmed for the Bear Whisperer.

“Video of the stalking was captured for use in the Harvey Neil Anthony television hunting show and Nature Productions, Inc.,” the court documents read.

The 55-year-old from Benton, Maine allegedly lied about where he killed the bear - saying he killed it at a legal fishing spot in Berger Bay, rather than a national park

The 55-year-old from Benton, Maine allegedly lied about where he killed the bear – saying he killed it at a legal fishing spot in Berger Bay, rather than a national park

Anthony posted several photos, including this one, tagging Homer as the site rather than the Kenai Fjords National Park in Alaska.

Anthony posted several photos, including this one, tagging Homer as the site rather than the Kenai Fjords National Park in Alaska.

Prosecutors said the animal was killed in Alaska's Kenai Fjords National Park, which is home to 3,000 to 4,000 black bears.

Prosecutors said the animal was killed in Alaska’s Kenai Fjords National Park, which is home to 3,000 to 4,000 black bears.

The footage was reportedly broadcast on the show, along with more footage of the second unlawful killing in the national park, prosecutors allege.

If found guilty of both charges, Anthony, along with his production company Nature Productions, will face up to a year in prison and fees of up to $100,000 per person and $200,000 per organization, the Daily Beast reported.

The Humane Society has criticized Anthony’s supposed murder, calling it a “memorial” and wishing harsh punishments for him.

Trophy hunters often claim that killing them advances wildlife conservation, but these claims reveal the cruelty and selfishness at the core of the purported sport. We urge the Department of Justice to seek the maximum sanctions available for these egregious acts,” the association told DailyMail.com on Wednesday.

Anthony is expected to appear in court on June 10 for his hearing.

There are an estimated 3,000 to 4,000 black bears on the Kenai Peninsula and an estimated 410 bears are born each year in the area.

There are approximately 100,000 black bears in Alaska and their only predator is humans.

The complaint alleged that Anthony and his crew should have known that it was illegal to fish inside the park

The complaint alleged that Anthony and his crew should have known that it was illegal to fish inside the park

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